June Books

Now we’re talking! After a few months of minimal reading, I’m almost back up to speed.

June brought a wide variety of books, too.

JuneBooks

Half of What You Hear by Kristyn Kusek Lewis – A woman new to town takes on an assignment to write about an infamous, long-time resident, one with connections to her husband’s family she never knew. It’s an easy beach read, but I’d recommend others over this one given its poor payoff.

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams – Websites describe the book as Bridget Jones’s Diary meets Americanah, and that’s probably better than any description I could provide, but I’ll add one more reference – add a healthy cup of Amazon Prime’s Fleabag to the mix, and you’ve got Queenie. The title character is a Jamaican British woman trying to figure it all out, making several poor choices along the way. I really loved this character, especially when we learn (alongside her) how her past affects her present.

My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent – This is a difficult book to read, and had I known more about the content before picking it up, I would not have; I have a hard time reading about kids in peril, and an even harder time when sexual abuse is added to the mix. But, I finished it, and I will say the ending was very satisfying. Readers who aren’t put off by the content might find this worthwhile.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis Johnson – Given my penchant for short stories, and all of the “Best of 2018” lists this collection made, I gave it a whirl. All narrated by very flawed men (“Strangler Bob” gives you an idea), some of the stories were intriguing, but George Saunders, he is not.

Cribsheet by Emily Oster – I don’t recommend books I haven’t read, and this is especially true in recommending books to new parents. So I had to read this one before telling my sister and brother-in-law to pick it up. The concept is brilliant – Oster is an economist who says all decisions – including parenting ones – need to be weighed with a sort of cost/benefit analysis, and we also need to consider who benefits. She reviews the research on hot-button issues and lays out the pros and cons so that parents can make the decisions for themselves. Perhaps my favorite passage to sum up her approach is this: “The bottom line—perhaps the most important in this book—is that parents are people, too. Having a kid doesn’t make you stop being a person with needs and desires and ambitions. It almost certainly changes those, but it doesn’t eliminate them. Being a good parent isn’t about completely subsuming your entire personhood into your children. In fact, if you let your kids rule, it can have the opposite effect.”

The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip by George Saunders – Longer than a typical short story but still shorter than a novella, this fable teaches the value of kindness and compassion and community. Perhaps reading it and enjoying Lane Smith’s illustrations with a younger audience would have made more of an impact on me, but as it was, this isn’t my favorite Saunders piece.

Down Came the Rain by Brooke Shields – Who knew Brooke Shields could write?! If you want to better understand postpartum depression, Shields’s honest memoir is an educational, insightful read.

Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon – A memoir about growing up black and overweight, Heavy is well-written and reads like a novel. Laymon covers his complicated relationship with his mother, academia, his weight, and love. If memoirs are your favorite genre, this is worth a read.

The best of June:
Queenie for lovers of Bridget Jones’s Diary, Americanah, and Fleabag
Cribsheet for new parents or parents-to-be
Heavy: An American Memoir for lovers of this genre

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